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How to Preserve Your Family’s Oral History

How to preserve your family's oral history - Audio Transcription Center Blog

Make all family events unforgettable by interviewing your relatives while they’re all together––you’ll hear amazing stories and gather surprising information that you did not know about them.
Just don’t get caught up in the trap of trying to make it perfect, or you’ll never start. Here are 2 easy ways to preserve your relative’s oral history:

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Timecodes in Transcription: Types and Uses

Timecodes in Transcription Types and Uses - ATC Blog

Timecodes, also known as timestamps, are inserted into transcripts at specified intervals, providing a marker of where the text is found in a video or audio file.

Timecodes have been traditionally used in video captioning, but are becoming popular for use in panel discussions, legal transcripts, market research, oral history, and podcasts. The placement of timestamps makes it easier for a person to review or listen to a particular moment or conversation within a file.

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6 Essential Habits to Record Better Audio

6 essential habits to record better audio - ATC Blog

Audio quality is one of the key variables that affect a transcriptionist’s output and cost. Clean audio results in better quality and accurate transcripts, while poor audio quality can make the job of a transcriptionist extremely difficult, leading to longer production time and a higher cost. The good news is that you can improve your audio recordings by following a few simple steps:

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8 Words to use instead of “Very” [Infographic]

Words are the currency of communication. A strong vocabulary will make your writing more powerful, improve your comprehension when reading, enhance your interviews, and even help you transcribe faster.

No matter if you are working on your next book or interviewing subjects for research, legal, or academic content, you can start improving your vocabulary today by using this easy guide with 8 options to substitute the word “very”.

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StoryCorps – Eat, Drink, Be Merry, and Record?

Eat drink be merry and record - Audio Transcription Center Blog

Holidays offer a perfect time for family to reminisce, and possibly to pass those rather embarrassing family stories around the holiday table along with helpings of stuffing and mashed potatoes.  This year though, make sure to grab a recording device (digital recorder, iPhone, video camera — there are so many options), ask questions you’ve always wondered about the answers to, and listen to the stories while you have the chance.

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Computer transcription misleads even as it impresses

With speech-to-text transcription, what are you really saving?

[Patrick Emond contributed to this post]

Last week, IBM trumpeted  their latest achievement in automated speech-to-text: a record-low error rate of 5.5 percent. But always, especially with regard to saving money on transcription, you have to read the fine print.

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Commas can make or break transcription (or the case of the $10 million comma)

Commas can make or break transcription - ATC Blog
Oakie, Oakhurst’s loveable mascot, seen here seemingly succumbing to exhaustion with a world-weary smile and an absent gaze. Unknown whether overtime was a factor.

In which we ponder how an antiquated Maine labor law, a class-action lawsuit, and a controversial bit of punctuation can make the national news.

Recently, my wife forwarded me a New York Times article about a lawsuit in my home state of Maine. This isn’t a common occurrence, for how often does one really lend much thought to labor disputes in their hometown? But this one had a special flavor to it, that speaks to the risk inherent in subpar transcription.

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